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Archive for the ‘planters’ Category

When the plants flowered and started to wilt it was time to harvest.
The no hill method worked well, i didnt need to dig very much and the harvest was about 2 lbs per plant. Not great but not bad either.
Not a massive harvest, but very satisfying all the same. There was no evidence of wire worm damage, as was foretold by a worker at the nursery.
The potatoes are very flavourful, cook quickly and are beautiful to look at – at least, I think so.

There were almost as many nuggets as there were full sized specimens. I found a wonderful recipe for these. Quick, simple and delicious:

GRILLED MARINATED BABY POTATOES

Scrub and then fully cook nugget potatoes in salted water. Do not overcook. Plunge in cold water when done to stop cooking. Halve each potato after cooking, not before.

Mix 1/4 cup mayonnaise and 1/4 cup dijon mustard in a bowl large enough to hold the potatoes. Add 3 crushed garlic cloves, 1/2 tsp salt, pepper to taste and whisk it into a creamy sauce. Sprinkle in some fresh thyme or rosemary if you have it.

Add cooled cooked potatoes to bowl, stir gently to coat and then cover and refridgerate until 1 hour before serving. Allow them to warm a bit at room temperature. When your meat comes off the grill to rest, have these ready to go right on!

To finish: Place them on a well sprayed hot grill, and do not turn until they are beginning to char. Turn each piece once only and grill quickly. Remove to a serving platter and watch them disappear.

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After 4 months spent principally at the cottage, we are now back in the city for a bit. This garden was planted quickly during drop-ins to water house plants and collect mail.

I missed out on harvesting the black currents, so hopefully the birds feasted well. Our timing for blueberries is perfect, however.

Oodles of blueberries on our 3 bushes.

Yellow onions, green onions and leeks are doing best. Some beets grew beautifully while others put all their energy into lush greens and have spindly roots.

A cooperative beet
Uncooperative beets with small roots and excessive greens

I have re- planted carrots twice and still only have about 2 dozen growing. So I’m replanting again here at the beginning of August in hopes that I can still get a crop.

Tomatoes – only 2 this year – are doing well. Considering the amount of neglect caused by our quarantining away, and the massive ant problem I had back in the Spring, I am relatively satisfied. I will plant some garlic in September, and next year concentrate more effort into potatoes and onions which we use most often anyway.

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In between bigger projects, we spent half a morning making some fast improvements:

Swapped out last years worn and faded-to-pink flag with a fresh one from the dollar store. $2.50
Set up a new laundry line in a sunnier spot. PVC coated cable, 2 clamps, 1 turnbuckle and some hooks $21.
Installed a magnetic mesh screen on our seldom used “front” door for better air flow.
Installs in minutes and the only tool required is scissors. Great value at $16
These herb (and cucumber) planters looked messy sitting directly on the deck and attracted a lot of debris, woodbugs, etc.
Getting them up on wheeled planter caddies looks neater and the deck stays cleaner. $27 for 3.

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Its so interesting to me to look at photos I have taken of the garden over the past few months, so posting some here to make them easily accessible. The first three were taken in the exact same spot. This is a flower garden that has tomato, rhubarb and strawberries co-planted.

April
May
June

And then there is my lower veg garden that was previously full of gladiolus and some shrubs.

Snap peas left. Beets in the middle and carrots to the right. Back row is sugar baby melon territory and a newly planted asparagus patch that should bear next year.
Plus bush beans front and centre. Melons doing nothing weeks later.
Snow peas and snap peas starting to flower. Melons still nothing. Its too cool this June and they are only getting about 6 hours sun in this location when there is sun at all. So next year either no melons or find a better spot. Snuck a second carrot planting into the barren melon patch as consolation
Neighbours Derek and Natalie gave me some sunflowers!

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I’ve been tearing out plants and shrubs that I haven’t found sufficiently rewarding.

A small pine has been replaced by a spud patch, a fern and a mystery plant with two rhubarbs, and an unsuccessful attempt at a moss garden proved too sunny, so now I have shade tolerant veggies like lettuce and radish growing there.

The rose has been a hassle since day one. It grows like a weed, overwhelms the trellis, needs constant cutting back, and always leaves us bleeding. But its an old, old rose….so it stays, right? Not any more.

In an exchange of marital confidences, it recently emerged that we both loathe the rose. So I dug it out.

Just about to begin its massive spring growth.

Already beginning to mangle the trellis, again.

But now its in the trailer for its last ride to the green waste.

The rose occupied a premium spot, with lots of sun and well drained soil. There is some over spray from the watering system, and a trellis.

Vegetable seeds are scarce, but with some effort I finally tracked down some scarlet runner bean seeds. They have bright red flowers to attract hummingbirds, are heat tolerant, grow indeterminately and the more you pick the more they produce.

They should love this spot. Plus my opponents, the deer, would literally have to approach from the road to get to them, which they never have.

Rand built a quickie planter at the bottom of the trellis to tidy things up a bit, and hold some soil. And now we have more food on the way. They should be fun to watch grow as they are aggressive climbers.

Scarlet Emperor bean seedlings, each in a wreath of seaweed.

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What was under that deck? Lots of ferns, salal and blackberries…and some flat land!

A peek up at the former deck, from cottage level.

Quick, lets plant something!. I had 8 seed potatoes left, so in they went. Since big, bold deer are frequent visitors from the adjoining park, it will be tricky to fend them off.

Looking in the window.

For a start, I’m mulching my plants heavily with seaweed from the nearby beach. When I go for a walk with the dog, I take a 5 gallon pail and selectively fill it, being careful to not take too much from any one area of the beach, as it is an important part of the ecosystem.

A quick rinse and into the garden.

Opinions are split as to whether the seaweed needs rinsing or not. I give it one quick fresh water rinse to take off the surface salt. I have read that deer don’t like to eat seaweed. But I also know they love salt…Stand by for my report in the months ahead.

Rand picked up a faucet splitter that allows us to run a hose up to the new garden area. This will also allow me to keep the composter wetted. Big improvement.

There are 8 potatoes under those piles of seaweed. that mess in the background is the “door to Narnia” before I attacked it.

Behind the new spud patch, there is an area that was a hole in the now-demolished deck. My kids called it the door to Narnia.

And Rand used to sweep leaves into the hole. So now, under a stump, more blackberries and ivy vines, what do I discover but about 12 inches of dark rich compost!. So I spent the whole afternoon with a heavy maddock, chopping out huge roots.

Rand came up and sawed down an acacia (weed) tree that would impact the light. And I hauled a half ton of debris down to the utility trailer for next weeks trip to the Green Waste.

Nasty blackberry roots.
The door to Narnia is ready to plant.

I will keep collecting, rinsing and distributing seaweed, both up top, and as a mulch for the lower garden. Here are some advantages:

Its free, and plentiful

It has dozens of trace minerals and is touted as a perfect, balanced fertilizer.

It rehydrates with each rain fall or watering, and delivers its goodness to the roots by leaching seaweed ‘tea’.

It prevents evaporation of water by shielding the ground surrounding plants.

It is attractive to helpful critters like worms and pillbugs.

But slugs don’t like it because it has sharp edges when it dries, and is a bit salty.

It doesn’t contain seeds or other plant bits that can take hold in your garden. Other mulches can hide surprises like…foxtails!

Like peat moss, it aerates the soil. Unlike manure, it doesnt need to decompose before using. Pile it on, 4-6 inches deep. Or more. This stuff is gold.

The only question is, will the deer scarf it up as quickly as I can lay it down?

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Our lives are distilled to two realms: Inside the cottage or outside to work on projects and go for walks. Its all so simple. No need to keep track of the date, no need to plan days and movements around social events or the numerous groups we each belong to. So we go out whenever weather permits, and when we are tired, cold or wet – back in. Some other things going in and out:

The old sheds and deck went out.
And loads of new lumber came in.
Piles of weeds and other green waste went out…
And a fresh load of clean crush came in to be spread about.
This pine tree, which was getting a bit big for its britches, came out…
And a new deep planter for growing potatoes went in.

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Day lilies

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Phlox

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Gladiolas

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Coreopsis

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Statice, I think

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Crocisima and wild geranium

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Bee balm

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Mexican grass and annuals

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Honeysuckle and roses on the trellis.
And these…

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Yellow loosestrife and the first plox

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Alstibe

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Sweet William transplanted from the beach in the Kootenays

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Wild geranium

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Delphinium

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Clematis

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Over-wintered snapdragons

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A profusion of succulents

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Jasmine - more on this shortly!

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So satisfying to pick one sad corner of the garden and do some spring cleaning.
That’s what I did last Friday while waiting for the honey wagon to come and pump out the septic tank.

Before

Before

and After

and After

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